Teen Advisory Corp

Match Me If You Can by Tiana Smith

Teen Advisory Corps member Claire enjoyed Bozeman grown author Tiana Smith's reading of her YA debut Match Me If You Can so much she devoured it in one night! She had this to say:

Homecoming is just around the corner, but Mia is still trying to find a date. Robyn, Mia’s best friend and the high school’s matchmaker, thinks that Logan, who always seems to be flirting with Mia, would be the perfect date. Unconvinced, Mia has her eyes on Vince, a soccer player for the school’s team. As much as Mia tries to convince Robyn that they are perfect for each other, Robyn will not match them together. Determined for Vince to ask her to homecoming, Mia logs on to Robyn’s email and against her wishes, matches them together. All is going well, especially when Vince asks her to homecoming at the soccer game. This is exactly what Mia wanted, but as they spend time together, she realizes how awkward it is. When Mia realizes her mind keeps on thinking of Logan, she is not sure which boy is her perfect match.

 

Match Me If You Can by Tiana Smith is an un-put-down-able romance that discusses the struggles of high school and high school relationships. Smith has an honest and genuine voice that truly conveys the thoughts of a high schooler and makes Mia’s situation more relatable. Balancing the love aspect of the story with other concerns such as scholarship opportunities and changing friendships adds to the genuinity of Mia’s life. And though there are times when it seems all hope is lost, Mia works to fix her mistakes, making her a loveable character. Match Me If You Can by Tiana Smith is a hopeful and charming story about teen love.

Books: 
Match Me If You Can Cover Image
$17.99
This title is likely unavailable. Email or call for price and availability.
ISBN: 9781250168719
Published: Swoon Reads - January 8th, 2019

Dear Haiti, Love Alaine by Maika Moulite, and Mirtza Moulite

Claire enjoyed Dear Haiti, Love Alaine by Maika and Mirtza Moulite, She says:

Alaine, an aspiring journalist, has always looked up to her mom, the host of the popular news show Sunday Politicos. Tuning in to watch every episode from her home in Miami with her father, Alaine is able to “connect” with her mom. Being a feminist and believer of justice, her mom is not afraid to call out guests for saying the wrong things, but on one episode, her response seems uncharacteristic. Due to backlash, she travels home to Haiti to stay with her sister. When Alaine goes to school the days following, she faces a lot of reminders of her mom’s behavior in a not-s0-nice manner. Outraged by her peers reaction, Alaine takes a class assignment too far and ends up getting into a lot of trouble. Disappointed by Alaine’s actions, her father sends her to Haiti to volunteer at her aunt’s organization. It is then that Alaine learns some surprising information regarding her mom. Though it is not under the best circumstances, Alaine is glad to finally visit “the Homeland” and be able to spend time with her mom. And while she’s there, she learns more about her family’s past and what it could mean for the future. 

Dear Haiti, Love Alaine by Maika Moulite and Maritza Moulite is an intriguing story that unravels through journal entries, letters, postcards, emails, and text messages. In addition to uncovering Alaine’s family history, you are immersed in Haitian culture. The glimpses of Haiti that are sprinkled throughout the book add to Alaine’s discoveries, and further immerses you. Dear Haiti, Love Alaine by Maika Moulite and Maritza Moulite is an endearing story emphasizing the importance of family and leaves you thinking about the chances you would take for the people you love.

Books: 
Dear Haiti, Love Alaine Cover Image
$18.99
ISBN: 9781335777096
Availability: Available in Warehouse. Wait for Email Confirmation for ETA
Published: Inkyard Press - September 3rd, 2019

Review: What Makes Us by Rafi Mittelfeldt

Teen Advisory Corps member Marley enjoyed What Makes Us by Rafi Mittelfeldt. Pre-order your copy today!

"Eran Sharon is passionate, maybe a little too passionate. He is quick to anger and always seems to escalate any situation he’s in. After a video of him pushing a man at a protest goes viral, the press is quick to discover that the father Eran has never met was a terrorist. While news vans and reporters pile up at his door, Eran is left wondering if extremism is hereditary or if he has a chance to be different from his father.

    What Makes Us is the type of book that will make you think. It brings up the classic nurture/nature debate, asks if violent protest is different from terrorism, shows how media twists reality, etc. It definitely added an extra layer to the book, making the reader wonder alongside the characters about where they stand on these issues. 

    Rafi Mittlefehldt sometimes shifts into second person in his writing, which also added a level of connection to the characters. He makes the reader look through the eyes of his characters and see their perspective on issues. It made it easy to empathize with the characters.

    Eran’s character development felt very realistic. His development doesn’t start out of nowhere, there are a couple of triggers that spurr him forward along the way. Mittlefehldt shows him thinking about how he acts and how he wants to act as he works to control his anger. I appreciated how Eran slips up a couple of times before he starts to improve and still isn’t perfect by the end of the book. Sometimes it feels like YA books either have no character development or the character develops out of nowhere and is suddenly perfect by the end of the book, so having a book that actually had realistic development was a pleasant surprise. 

    To nitpick, some points in the book that were written to be giant shocking moments fell a bit flat. I think it might be because there were so many moments that were supposed to feel surprising that it wasn’t anymore. Some of the less important points were a tiny bit overwritten too, which might have contributed to that. 

    Overall, I really enjoyed What Makes Us. It was easy to get into, and the characters were likeable. The beginning reminded me of Anger is a Gift and the rest—especially Mittlefehldt’s writing style—reminded me of Picture Us In the Light. I’d give What Makes Us a solid ⅘ and I would recommend it to people who want a realistic book that deals with difficult issues without being too sad. 

Books: 
What Makes Us Cover Image
$17.99
This title is likely unavailable. Email or call for price and availability.
ISBN: 9780763697501
Published: Candlewick - October 15th, 2019

Hope and Other Punchlines by Julie Buxbaum

Teen Advisory Corps member Claire has this to say about Hope and Other Punchlines by Julie Buxbaum

Abbi Hope, nicknamed Baby Hope, has been well-known her whole life since she was captured in a famous photo taken on 9/11. Recognized wherever she goes, she has heard many peoples’ stories and remains a symbol of hope for them. But wanting to escape from her life-long legacy for a little while, she takes a job at a local day-camp and spends the day with four-year-olds, her senior counselor, and Josh, the other junior counselor. Meeting for the first time, Josh instantly recognizes Abbi and wants her help on a mission to track down the other members of the Baby Hope picture. Not having much of a choice, Abbi agrees, and together they set out to hear from the other survivors.


Hope and Other Punchlines by Julie Buxbaum is a hopeful story about two teens whose lives are significantly tied to 9/11. As someone who was born after 9/11, I know the devastation of the day, but I will never be able to understand it the same way. Buxbaum’s story allowed me to learn about the true impact of this day and how it still resonates years later. Abbi and Josh’s stories work cohesively to provide different perspectives on 9/11 and are accessible to readers who may not remember 9/11 or who were not alive yet. Hope and Other Punchlines by Julie Buxbaum is certainly not an easy book to read, but definitely an important one.

 

Books: 
Hope and Other Punch Lines Cover Image
$18.99
ISBN: 9781524766771
Availability: Available in Warehouse. Wait for Email Confirmation for ETA
Published: Delacorte Press - May 7th, 2019

Stolen Time by Danielle Rollins

Teen Advisory Corps member Zoe had this to say about Stolen Time by Danielle Rollins. 

Stolen Time isn’t so much about time travel as it is about why you really do not want to be living in Seattle in the future. Seriously, Danielle Rollins’ depiction of the year 2077 showcases a city devastated by an earthquake and tsunami that permanently flooded the area. And then, of course, there’s the rumored cannibal who leads a gang to terrorize Seattle at night. This apocalyptic state awaits our heroine Dorothy, who stows away on board what turns out to be a time machine in 1913. In the future, the pilot must accept Dorothy into his gang of teenage time travelers as they search for their missing leader.

The novel’s concept is tantalizing, but don’t expect a major focus on travel to different time periods. Instead, the dystopian themes take prominence, and a major portion of the book is actually more of a heist story involving breaking into a 1980s military base. Of course, that has an appeal of its own, but the reading experience would have been more enjoyable had I not gone into it expecting a wide variety of time travel. Readers do get introduced to historical elements as the teens discuss when and where they lived before being picked for the team, though these characters do not play major roles.

Ironically, my main complaint about Stolen Time is the pacing. The story takes place in what felt like about one day, which is not nearly enough time to develop the relationships central to the story. Plus, Dorothy seemed to adjust to 2077 life just a bit too fast for someone abruptly ripped from Victorian life. However, the more scientific aspects of Rollins’ work were very interesting, and the last section of the book made for a very exciting read. Overall, the future (sequels) is ripe with possibility.

Books: 
Stolen Time (Dark Stars #1) Cover Image
$17.99
ISBN: 9780062679949
Availability: Available in Warehouse. Wait for Email Confirmation for ETA
Published: HarperTeen - February 5th, 2019

The Lovely War by Julie Berry

Teen Advisory Corps member Zoe had this to say about The Lovely War by Julie Berry. 

Sometimes young adult books seem to fall prey to repetitive formats and cliches. And sometimes a book like Lovely War by Julie Berry comes along and suddenly Greek gods are sitting around a World War II-era hotel room and narrating a story that takes place during the previous world war. Despite all the fantasy, somehow, Berry also manages to construct an honest tale and weave together readers’ emotions like the Fates themselves. Through four main characters, Hazel, James, Colette, and Aubrey, we gain insight into a wide variety of perspectives of war and see the struggles facing those two sets of lovers in a way that represents those of so many more.

Lovely War is a study of the relationship between the titular ideas: love and war. And that’s the amazing part of the story, how it’s not just entertaining but meaningful as well. Through James’s perspective, we see the psychological destruction of war, and how that damage affects those like Hazel who love suffering soldiers. Colette represents the true tragedy of war as she has lost so much, and Aubrey helps bring the oft-overshadowed story of black WWI soldiers to life. Their lives intersect like music, fitting as Hazel and Aubrey play piano and Colette sings.

Love, readers learn, is the vital ingredient for surviving war. This Aphrodite explains between glimpses into the lives of humans. And here the book is optimistic, offering hope even for those thrust into the atrocities of war. Plus, Lovely War makes for a very educational historical fiction, as we’re introduced not only to real-life battles but to changing musical trends and civil rights progress as well. Thus, Berry’s writing produces a unique rhythm as it follows a complex melody, suggesting haunting beauty along the way.

Books: 
Lovely War Cover Image
$18.99
ISBN: 9780451469939
Availability: Available in Warehouse. Wait for Email Confirmation for ETA
Published: Viking Books for Young Readers - March 5th, 2019

Love from A to Z by SK Ali

Zayneb has always spoken up against her Islamophobic teacher, but one day he has finally had it and gets her suspended the week before spring break. Already having plans to travel to Qatar, she leaves a week early and stays with her Auntie Nandy. Adam is returning to Qatar to visit his dad and sister and to finally tell them about his multiple sclerosis diagnosis. On the airplane from London to Doha, Qatar, Zayneb and Adam meet. Both being Muslim and keeping a journal recording life’s marvels and oddities, they feel a connection and intrigue towards each other. Adam and Zayneb continue to run into each other in Doha, and find that they are attracted to the other. Told through alternating journal entries of marvels and oddities, Adam and Zayneb realize things about themselves, and discover ways to overcome their obstacles.

 

Love From A to Z by S.K. Ali is a powerful and impactful story about two Muslim teens struggling with challenges in their life. What I find most important about this story is its realness and truthfulness. The glimpses of Doha accompanied with Islamic culture helps to set the tone for the story and allows the reader to feel as if they are connected with the characters. In addition, Ali wrote with such passion that the reader is able to step into the character’s shoes and experience their feelings. Love From A to Z by S.K. Ali is an unforgettable book that expanded my global perspective.

Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E Smith

When the power goes out all across New York City, Lucy and Owen meet for the first time in an elevator. Not having any other plans once they are out of the shaft, they decide to spend the rest of the day together, and end up talking about postcards. However, once the power comes back on, the blackout’s spell is broken and Lucy and Owen return to their routines. A few days later, they both find out that their families are moving in complete opposite directions, and they realize this might be the last time they see each other. But as they continue their new adventures, it becomes clear that they still think about what could have been. Through a series of postcards, emails, and meet-ups, Lucy and Owen find their way back to each other in  The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith.

 

I was drawn to this story because I thought the premise of being stuck in an elevator was creative, and I was interested to see how the story would go from there. The story was well-developed and I felt transported to where the characters were in that point in time. I also really enjoyed the connection the characters shared with getting caught in the elevator during the blackout, and their postcard connection. It was really enjoyable to watch the characters grow and discover themselves, too. For lovers of geography and unexpected meet-cutes, The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith combines both in an unforgettable way.

Books: 
The Geography of You and Me Cover Image
$10.99
ISBN: 9780316254762
Availability: Available in Warehouse. Wait for Email Confirmation for ETA
Published: Poppy - March 3rd, 2015

Spin the Dawn by Elizabeth Lim

Pre-order Today! Due out July 2019!

Spin the Dawn by Elizabeth Lim is an enchanting story described as Mulan meets Project Runway, that later develops into an adventure of epic proportions. Filled with trials, romance, and a pair of magic scissors. Maia will take you on her quest to become the greatest tailor in the land.Where you mill travel with her through a beautifully crafted world of war, riches, and natural power; where you will experience every possible emotion. 


If there's not a sequel I will die inside.
 

- Maggie S

Books: 
Spin the Dawn (The Blood of Stars #1) Cover Image
$18.99
ISBN: 9780525646990
Availability: Available in Warehouse. Wait for Email Confirmation for ETA
Published: Knopf Books for Young Readers - July 9th, 2019

Field Notes on Love by Jennifer E. Smith

Hugo and his girlfriend Margaret were going to spend the last part of summer going on a train ride across the United States before starting college. At the last minute, Margaret breaks up with Hugo but encourages him to still go on the tour. The only problem being that everything was booked under the name Margaret Campbell. Hugo’s solution is to find another Margaret Campbell who is willing to be his travel companion (solely for the purpose of being the name of the reservation). He gets plenty of responses and in the end he chooses Mae—an aspiring filmmaker who’s looking for an adventure, and a new film idea. At first, their companionship is strictly business, but as the ride continues they realize it may be something more.

 

Field Notes on Love by Jennifer E. Smith is a contemporary approach to the intrigue of the strangers on a train premise. I immediately fell in love with Hugo and Mae, but as the story continued I loved them even more. Both characters are dealing with a sort of pressure that they try to work out on the train—Hugo is expected to go to college on scholarship with his siblings, and Mae was rejected to her dream film program for college. It’s this in common that really brings them together and helps encourage them. You couldn’t help but cheer on Hugo and Mae. In addition, the story was light-hearted making it even more enjoyable to read. You also get glimpses of the two families and what it’s like traveling by train. One of my new favorite romances, Field Notes on Love by Jennifer E. Smith is a wonderful story of self-discovery on one train ride.

Books: 
Field Notes on Love Cover Image
$18.99
ISBN: 9780399559419
Availability: Backordered - ETA Unknown
Published: Delacorte Press - March 5th, 2019

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